Tag Archives: World War I

A Funny-Looking Airplane

Above is an LS Cruiser, built by Lincoln Standard Aircraft Company of Lincoln, Nebraska, and shown here sometime between 1920 and 1922. The photo is from the NSHS collections and appears in Wings Over Nebraska: Historic Aviation Photographs, published by … Continue reading

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Ending the War to End All Wars

When World War I concluded with an armistice signed at the eleventh hour of the eleventh day of the eleventh month of 1918, Nebraskans joined people everywhere in celebration. The news reached this state in the middle of the night, … Continue reading

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The Ruins along Highway 2

Highway 2 through the Sandhills is one of Nebraska’s most scenic drives. Deep in the Sandhills lakes country, near the tiny town of Antioch, stand desolate, oddly-shaped concrete ruins visible from the highway—as if Antioch had once been a much … Continue reading

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Will Pigs Help Win the War?

After the United States entered World War I in April of 1917, President Woodrow Wilson appointed Herbert Hoover head of the U.S. Food Administration. Hoover believed that food would win the war and established specific days to encourage people to … Continue reading

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Canning the Way to Victory

During American participation in World War I the U.S. Food Administration, under the direction of Herbert Hoover, launched a massive campaign to persuade Americans to economize on food and to grow gardens in their backyards. Housewives were urged to “can … Continue reading

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“I Don’t Know What We’d Have Done Without the Indians”

  A labor shortage during World War I left western Nebraska potato farmers facing the loss of their crop. They brought in Lakota (Sioux) Indians as harvesters, beginning a tradition that lasted from 1917 through the 1950s. The story is … Continue reading

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What is the F.A.U.?

The NSHS Library/Archives Reference Staff help researchers from all over Nebraska and the world answer countless history, genealogy and research questions every day.  With the vast resources available at NSHS, the answers are seemingly at our fingertips.  Sometimes, however, even … Continue reading

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Pershing for President in 1920

World War I did not produce a military hero who became President, but it did launch at least one aspirant, Gen. John J. Pershing, who was supreme commander of the U.S. forces in Europe during the war. Pershing challenged a … Continue reading

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Dr. Charles Arnold’s Helmet

  With one look at this helmet, you know it has a story to tell.  Fortunately, it has a happy ending. This helmet belonged to Dr. Charles H. Arnold.  Arnold was a native of Dorchester, Nebraska, and received his medical … Continue reading

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