Tag Archives: Omaha

Frederick W. Thayer’s Invention

The catcher’s mask in baseball was invented by Frederick W. Thayer, a Harvard baseball player who once played the game in Omaha. He modified a fencing mask which enabled the catcher to move closer to home base and receive the … Continue reading

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George A. Joslyn of Omaha

The name of George A. Joslyn (1846-1916) is connected with two of Omaha’s most notable structures: his opulent residence, often referred to as “The Castle,” and the Joslyn Art Museum, constructed and endowed by Sarah Joslyn in memory of her … Continue reading

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An “April Fool Lie”

Readers of the Omaha Daily Bee on April 2, 1885, must have been astounded to learn of the sighting of a gigantic serpent in the Missouri River near Omaha. The Bee’s improbable tale included a frightening description of the creature, … Continue reading

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Omaha’s Shocking Nineteenth-Century Art

In 1890 a young man named Carey Judson Warbington picked up a chair and began smashing a painting that hung in an Omaha gallery. The painting was Return of Spring by William Adolphe Bouguereau, in which Spring is personified by … Continue reading

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African Americans in Nebraska—special issue of Nebraska History is now online

Due to the great demand for the Fall/Winter 2010 issue of Nebraska History, we have posted the entire issue on our website. If you’d rather read the articles on paper, you have two options. One is to contact our Landmark … Continue reading

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A Real Romance

Valentine’s Day has long been the day to celebrate romantic love—but, as the Omaha Daily Bee pointed out on April 29, 1882, there’s “Nothing Like a Little Common Sense in Love Matters.” The Bee’s tale of what it termed a … Continue reading

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The Advertising-Selling League of Omaha

The Library/Archives holds a small collection of papers and publications relating to the Advertising-Selling League of Omaha. Included in the collection are pamphlets, newsletters, correspondence, event programs, etc. The organization was established in 1920 as a means for businessmen who … Continue reading

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The Great Omaha Train Robbery of 1909

On a night train heading into Omaha, “two men wearing long coats, slouch hats, and dark-blue polka dot handkerchiefs over their faces suddenly appeared over the tender and jumped down to the engine,” writes Tommy R. Thompson. One of the … Continue reading

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A New Leaf for the New Year

An old stack of discarded reporters’ assignment books provided the Omaha Daily Bee with the topic for a New Year’s Day column in 1900. An assignment book was once used by city editors to indicate which reporters were to cover specific … Continue reading

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Frederick Douglass’s Nebraska Sister

Frederick Douglass is remembered for his escape from slavery and for his speeches and autobiographies through which he advocated passionately for freedom and civil rights. But he wasn’t associated with Nebraska history… until recently. A series of letters uncovered in … Continue reading

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