Monthly Archives: September 2010

Recent Acquisition: POW Scrapbook

The Library/Archives recently acquired a scrapbook relating to a Nebraskan’s military service during World War II and his capture and imprisonment in a German POW camp.  Quentin M. Coyle, a native of Valley, Nebraska, served as a Liberator bomber pilot … Continue reading

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Posted in Library/Archives, Manuscript Collections | Tagged , , , , | 6 Comments

Neihardt’s Song of the Hoe

110 years ago, on September 27, 1900, The Youth’s Companion published a poem titled, “The Song of the Hoe”.   It was written by Nebraska’s own John G. Neihardt, who was just nineteen years old at the time.    Neihardt’s daughter, … Continue reading

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FREE PHOTO PRESERVATION WORKSHOP OCTOBER 2!

A few spaces remain for PICTURE PERFECT, a free photo preservation workshop scheduled from 9:00-4:00, Saturday, October 2, at the Nebraska History Museum, 15th & P streets, Lincoln.  The FREE workshop on how to care for and identify your family … Continue reading

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Henry Olerich, Utopian Reformer

Henry Olerich (1851-1927), a little-known utopian writer, saw his most famous book, A Cityless & Countryless World, published in 1893. It advocated the redistribution of population into planned communities of about one thousand people each as the solution to many … Continue reading

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Posted in Nebraska Timeline, Publications | Tagged , | 1 Comment

The Ugliest Artifact I’ve Ever Seen

Museum artifacts can be beautiful.  Museum artifacts can be plain.  Plain museum artifacts can sometimes represent ugly ideas.  It is rare, however, to come across a museum artifact that is, in actuality, literally ugly.  Ah, but we’ve found one!  Thanks … Continue reading

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Posted in Education and fun, Museum Collections | Tagged , , | 4 Comments

Look! Up in the Air!

Let your interest in aviation soar with the new pictorial compilation, “Wings Over Nebraska.” Based on the collections of the NSHS and produced through a decade of research by NSHS volunteer Vince Goers, the book will be released October 20 … Continue reading

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Free Auto Camps

Long distance travel in the early days of the automobile was difficult, and comforts along the way were few. Motorists pitched their own tents and cooked their own meals in the auto tourist camps that soon sprang up along the … Continue reading

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Photograph Blues

Do not adjust the color on your screen. These photographs really are blue. They are called cyanotypes and can be easily recognized by their uniform, bright blue color. Cyanotypes are created using light sensitive iron salts as opposed to silver salts used in more traditional black and white photograph.

Sir John Herschel developed the cyanotype process in 1842 using ferric ferrocyanide (sometime called Prussian blue) and ferrous ferricyanide (also known as Turnbull’s blue). Due to their unusual blue color, cyanotypes failed to gain popularity for commercial use. They did, however, become somewhat accepted during the 1890s and early 1900s with amateur photographers who found cyanotypes easy and cheap to make. Cyanotypes were often used to proof negatives and to make photograms of leaves and plants. Architectural drawings and blue prints use a process similar to cyanotypes. Continue reading

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The Mysteries of a Spanish-American War Uniform

One of the Nebraska History Museum’s wonderful volunteers is recataloging and researching the museum’s Spanish-American War uniforms.  This particular private’s uniform has the name Fred Lecron marked several times on its lining. Our volunteer’s eagle eye spotted something else that … Continue reading

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A Census Taker’s Lament

In 1880 Omaha’s third ward included the heart of the city’s gambling and vice. The notorious character of the district created unique problems for federal census takers there. One census worker complained to the Omaha Daily Bee on June 8, … Continue reading

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