Monthly Archives: July 2010

Why Bother with Nebraska History?

“Why should we bother with the history of Nebraska or any other state?” writes historian Frederick C. Luebke. “What makes its history distinctive or different, let us say, from that of Iowa or Kansas? A skeptic might well argue that … Continue reading

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Posted in Nebraska History, Publications | Tagged , , | 2 Comments

Butler’s Compensation Claim

David Butler, Nebraska’s first state governor, was one of the most controversial figures ever to hold the office. Faced with the problems of transition from a territorial to a state government, he got into difficulties with the Legislature at the … Continue reading

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Save the Buffalo

The extermination of the buffalo on the Plains occurred largely between 1870 and 1885, when an estimated ten million bison were killed by white Americans. Killing for hides was fashionable at the time, in order to supply tastes in the … Continue reading

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Bolte Manufacturing Company, Kearney, Nebraska

As the Curator of Manuscripts, I get to work with all sorts of interesting materials that document the history of individuals, families, businesses, and organizations here in Nebraska. I’m often pleasantly surprised when collections “inter-connect” and lead me to related … Continue reading

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Posted in Library/Archives, Manuscript Collections | Tagged , , , | 3 Comments

Bryan for President in 1920?

Ninety years ago, in the summer of 1920, Lincoln hosted a national political convention, albeit that of a third party. “Dry Convention Comes to Order ‘to Bury Booze,’” reported the July 21, 1920, Lincoln Daily Star as the national Prohibition … Continue reading

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“Judge Lynch” in Nebraska

During the six decades from 1859 to 1919, at least 45 men and two women died at the hands of lynch mobs in Nebraska while during the same period, only 23 or 24 individuals were executed according to law. Find … Continue reading

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From I-Scream to Eskimo Pie

On July 13, 1921 University of Nebraska graduate and former Thedford schoolteacher Christian K. Nelson found financial backing for a vanilla ice cream dessert coated with chocolate. He called it the I-Scream-Bar. He signed a partnership agreement with Russell Stover, … Continue reading

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In Search of Lost Graves

Tombstones are not usual garage sale fare. But when locating stolen headstones and forgotten gravesites, Nebraska State Historical Society employees and volunteers often encounter strange circumstances. Volunteer Cynthia Monroe reunites stolen tombstones with their owners. Tombstones have been thrown in … Continue reading

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Posted in Nebraska History News, Publications | Tagged | 1 Comment

Carmen the Cigarette Girl

The Nebraska History Museum is privileged to have a wonderful doll collection, which we have recently been recataloging. This one caught my eye, as it’s not every day that you see a doll with a cigarette in its mouth. This … Continue reading

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Lincoln’s Fatal Flood, July 6, 1908

This year’s rainy season has been made more tolerable, and safer, thanks to flood control initiatives over the last 60 years. But on July 6, 1908, nearly seven inches of rain fell on the capital city, with 2.5 inches coming … Continue reading

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